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Taxonomy Term : Student Retention

Moving Forward: enhancing progression through partnership

Authorship Details
Karla H. Benske, Julie Brown and Ruth Whittaker
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Article
Summary
This practice report presents a university-wide strategic approach to enhancing the first year student experience and to improving transition, progression and retention, called Moving Forward. Glasgow Caledonian University is a so-called post-1992 university with a high percentage of students from non-traditional, low-participation backgrounds, often coming into university as direct entrants onto levels two and three (of a four-level Scottish undergraduate degree). Its aim is to support a transformational approach to widening participation and the development of a transition pedagogy. Partnership working stands at its centre and underpins all activities from developing a Transition and Progression Framework, establishing a large Community of Practice and six Mini Communities of Practice, to negotiating formal partnership agreements with academic schools, Learner Support and the Students’ Association. The report charts the reasons for introducing Moving Forward, its development, activities, interim evaluation outcomes, achievements, as well as the challenges of sustaining such an initiative long term

The extent of and reasons for non re-enrolment: A case of Korea National Open University

Authorship Details
Hyoseon Choi
Yekyung Lee
Insung Jung
Colin Latchem
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
2013
Publication Title: 
The International Review and Research in Open & Distance Learning (IRRODL)
Publisher: 
Athabasca University
Volume: 
14
Issue or Number: 
4
Summary
Despite continuous efforts to increase retention, dropout rates are high in distance universities. The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate the extent and causes of non re-enrollment at a mega university, Korea National Open University; and 2) to suggest actions to improve the retention of students, in general, and those with higher risks of dropout in particular. A survey designed to establish the student demographics and the students’ main reasons for non re-enrollment was carried out during spring, 2009 with 1,353 respondents. The results indicate that a lack of feedback from the instructors, heavy workload, and difficulties in studying at a distance were the main reasons for non re-enrollment. The learners’ perceptions of the value of the degrees and their ages, gender, and educational backgrounds were also found to be significant factors in decisions not to re-enroll. The suggested solutions for reducing non re-enrollment include: a decrease in the number of required credit hours’ study per semester; the provision of stronger social support; the introduction of a more flexible enrollment system; and better use of the available technology and infrastructure to help both students and instructors build stronger learning communities. (Abstract by author)
Notes
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internatinal License.

Retention, persistence and success in on‐campus higher education, and their enhancement in open and distance learning

Authorship Details
Mantz Yorke
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Title: 
Open Learning : journal of open & distance learning
Volume: 
19
Issue or Number: 
1
Pagination: 
19-32
Summary
Terms such as retention and persistence reflect the interests of different parties. Much of the empirical and theoretical literature deals with retention from a ‘supply‐side’ perspective. This article has three main sections. The first consists of a summary of recent empirical findings from surveys of students who left their on‐campus programmes prematurely. The second section, which discusses a range of theoretical formulations, begins to shift the thrust of the article from on‐campus programmes towards open and distance learning. The third considers some implications for persistence in open and distance learning that follow from the preceding two main sections. The article concludes by stressing the importance of the student experience. (Abstract from author)
Notes
This article can be accessed at OUM Digital Library online Database - Journal of Open & Distance Learning

Benchmarking the habits and behaviours of successful students : A case study of academic-business collaboration

Authorship Details
Elizabeth Archer
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
2014
Publication Title: 
The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning (IRRODL)
Publisher: 
Athabasca University
Volume: 
15
Issue or Number: 
1
Summary
Student success and retention is a primary goal of higher education institutions across the world. The cost of student failure and dropout in higher education is multifaceted including, amongst other things, the loss of revenue, prestige, and stakeholder trust for both institutions and students. Interventions to address this are complex and varied. While the dominant thrust has been to investigate academic and non-academic risk factors thus applying a “risk” lens, equal attention should be given to exploring the characteristics of successful students which expands the focus to include “requirements for success”. Based on a socio-critical model for understanding of student success and retention, the University of South Africa (Unisa) initiated a pilot project to benchmark successful students’ habits and behaviours using a tool employed in business settings, namely Shadowmatch¼. The original focus was on finding a theoretically valid measured for habits and behaviours to examine the critical aspect of student agency in the social critical model. Although this was not the focus of the pilot, concerns regarding using a commercial tool in an academic setting overshadowed the process. This paper provides insights into how academic-business collaboration could allow an institution to be more dynamic and flexible in supporting its student population. (Abstract by authors)

The impact of student retention strategies: an empirical study

Authorship Details
Elke Leeds
Stacy Campbell
Hope Baker
Radwan Ali
Dorothy Brawley
John Crisp
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Title: 
Int. J. Management in Education
Volume: 
7
Issue or Number: 
1
Pagination: 
22-43
Summary
A major concern for institutions and instructors is the high dropout rate of students in online courses. This study investigated the impact of student retention strategies on retention rates in an online information systems course. A treatment group exposed to retention strategies related to student engagement, learning communities, student services and learner centred environments was compared with a control group. Results suggested that retention strategies may not impact retention rates. This is important as faculty are routinely encouraged to implement similar strategies in online course design and delivery. (Abstract by authors)

Build It But Will They Teach?: Strategies for Increasing Faculty Participation & Retention in Online & Blended Education

Authorship Details
Kristen Betts
Amy Heaston
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
Spring 2014
Publication Title: 
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration
Summary
The need for online and blended programs within higher education continues to grow as the student population in the United States becomes increasingly non-traditional. As administrators strategically offer and expand online and blended programs, faculty recruitment and retention will be key. This case study highlights how a public comprehensive university utilized the results of a 2012 institutional study to design faculty development initiatives, an online course development process, and an online course review process to support faculty participation and retention in online and blended programs. Recommendations based on this case study include replicable strategies on how to increase faculty participation and retention in online and blended programs using collaboration, support, and ongoing assessment. This case study is a compendium to the 2012 Armstrong institutional study highlighted in the article "Factors Influencing Faculty Participation & Retention In Online & Blended Education." (Abstract by authors)

Assessing Student Retention in Online Learning Environments: A Longitudinal Study

Authorship Details
Wallace Boston
Phil Ice
Melissa Burgess
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
Summer 2012, Vol. 12, No. 2
Publication Title: 
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration (OJDLA)
Summary
In their initial study, authors Boston, Ice, and Gibson (2011) explored the relationship between student demographics and interactions, and retention at a large online university. Participants in the preliminary study (n = 20,569) included degree-seeking undergraduate students who completed at least one course at the American Public University System (APUS) in 2007. Two notable findings from the study were (1) the importance of transfer credit, and (2) the consistency of activity in predicting continued enrollment. Interestingly, the latter finding was confirmed upon the analysis of longitudinal data from the current study. Further related to the latter finding-yet unexpected, was the existence of new literature that, although subtle, affirms the importance for online institutions to conduct ongoing research on these topics. Readers of the current study are encouraged to refer to the preliminary study toward a comprehensive understanding of these nuances. Though informative, the researchers wished to validate the original study findings through longitudinal evaluation of retention. (Abstract by authors)

Supporting Students by Telephone: a Technology for the Future of Student Support?

Authorship Details
Anne Gaskell
Roger Mills
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning (EURODL)
Summary
Student support by telephone has a long tradition in open and distance learning, but most recent research and discussion has concentrated on support by electronic means. Some recent findings however provide evidence that the telephone is still a particularly effective medium for student support. Four types of telephone contact are discussed which indicate that the appropriate and timely use of telephones can aid student retention, provide excellent opportunities for dialogue and is perceived as particularly encouraging by students. The use of the increasingly common mobile phone for student contact, particularly in countries without reliable landlines, also has huge potential; and textmessaging can be used by both institutions and tutors to support students. [ABSTRACT BU AUTHORS]

Comprehensive Assessment of Student Retention in Online Learning Environments

Authorship Details
Wallace E. Boston
Phil Ice
Angela M. Gibson
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
Spring 2011
Publication Title: 
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration
Publisher: 
University of West Georgia, Distance Education Center
Volume: 
14
Issue or Number: 
1
Summary
As the growth of online programs continues to rapidly accelerate, concern over the retention of the online learner is increasing. Educational administrators at institutions offering online courses, those fully online or brick and mortars, are eager to promote student achievement. Retention is critically important, not just for student success, but also for the success of these institutions of higher education. Models for understanding student persistence in the face-to-face environment are well established; however, many of the variables in these constructs are not present in the online environment or they manifest in significantly different ways. With attrition rates higher than in face-to-face programs, the development of models to explain online retention is considered imperative. This study moves in that direction by exploring the relationship between student demographics and interactions, and retention at a large online university. Analysis of data, which included an n of 20,569, provides an illustration of the importance of transfer credit and the consistency of activity in predicting continued enrollment. (Abstract by authors)

Factors Influencing Faculty Participation & Retention In Online & Blended Education

Authorship Details
Kristen Betts
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
Spring 2014
Publication Title: 
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration
Publisher: 
UWG Distance & Distributed Education Center
Volume: 
17
Issue or Number: 
1
Summary
aculty members play a central role in the development, implementation, and long-term sustainability of online and blended education programs. Therefore, faculty recruitment and retention strategies for these programs must align with the needs of the faculty. This article highlights the results of an institutional study conducted at a public comprehensive university in 2012 that examined factors influencing faculty participation and retention in online and blended education. This article also provides a comparative overview of the results of a similar institutional study conducted at The George Washington University (GWU) in 1997 that examined factors influencing faculty participation in distance education. The original surveys from the 1997 GWU study were updated for the 2012 Armstrong study. The results revealed that while technology and learning platforms have continued to evolve over the past 15 years, many of the needs and concerns of faculty are relatively similar. The results also revealed that faculty involvement is quintessential in the development and expansion of online and blended programs as well as in the design of faculty development initiatives. (Abstract by author)
Notes
Material appearing in The Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration may be distributed freely by electronic or any other means, providing that any such distribution is without charge (unless for purposes of cost recovery by interlibrary loan services) and that The Journal is acknowledged as the source. However, no article may be reprinted in any publication without the explicit written permission of the author(s)

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Latest updated: 23th July 2013

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