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Psychological myths in e-learning
Posted on 16 March 2013 by Shahril Effendi Bin Ibrahim (Senior Librarian)
Authorship Details
Clark, Donald
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Title: 
Medical teacher
Summary

Traditional education and training has paid scant attention to the psychology of learning. Despite detailed research into motivation, distribution and reinforcement, most current methods of delivery still rely on a supply-led, lecture and classroom-based model that flies in the face of the theory. With e-learning we have a chance to reflect on this gap between theory and practice. E-learning, in the sense of web-based learning, is a new discipline but the psychology of learning has a much longer pedigree. This paper relates some common myths about e-learning back to some major themes in the psychology of learning. Is e-learning faster and more effective? Many people get the wrong learning at the wrong time. Can e-learning help with prerequisite knowledge? Should the learning be massed or distributed, i.e. all at once or little and often? There are also the issues of motivation and cognitive engagement. How can e-learning motivate learners or how can we motivate learners into using this new medium? What type of cognitive engagement is necessary for learning? Traditional 'sheep-dip' methods of learning are poor on reinforcement. Can e-learning help reinforce learning?[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Latest updated: 23th July 2013

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